Enviroment News

Advertisements harm the planet, researchers say

Like them or loathe them, advertisements are everywhere. And they’re worsening the climate crisis, say social scientists. LONDON, 27 November, 2020 − Part and parcel of modern society, advertisements are so familiar in the background of most of our lives that we probably scarcely notice them. That’s a pity, because − if a new report… Read More »Advertisements harm the planet, researchers say

Sechin assures Putin his new Arctic project will produce 30 million tons of oil by 2024

It is the fourth time this year that Rosneft leader Igor Sechin sits down with Putin in the Kremlin to update the President on the development of Vostok Oil. “The project will generate huge synergies for Russian industries,” Sechin stressed as he covered the President’s table with maps that show how his company is developing… Read More »Sechin assures Putin his new Arctic project will produce 30 million tons of oil by 2024

Scientists urge federal government to ramp up conservation efforts in eastern Arctic

A team of Canadian scientists is urging the federal government to step up its conservation efforts in the eastern Arctic to try and save some of the last remaining year-round sea ice and the undiscovered organisms that live within it. In a new article, Witnessing Ice Habitat Collapse in the Canadian Arctic, released Thursday in… Read More »Scientists urge federal government to ramp up conservation efforts in eastern Arctic

‘A lost run’: logging and climate change decimate steelhead in B.C. river

As Kent O’Neill, general manager of a fishing lodge in the village of Gold River on Vancouver Island, looks ahead to the winter steelhead run, he worries that no fish will show up after a survey last winter found zero. “I want my grandkids to be able to experience the way these fisheries were before,”… Read More »‘A lost run’: logging and climate change decimate steelhead in B.C. river

Fukushima’s radioactive wastewater dilemma

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was severely damaged by an earthquake and tsunami in 2011, leading to a meltdown. Ongoing efforts to keep the plant cool during cleanup have generated large volumes of water contaminated with radioactive elements, and this water may soon be released into the ocean. Photo by Richard Atrero de Guzman/AFLO/Alamy… Read More »Fukushima’s radioactive wastewater dilemma

A Chilean archipelago rivaling the Galapagos fends off invasive species

Juan Fernandez Archipelago National Park in Chile is home to a wealth of species found nowhere else on Earth, where the proportion of endemic plants surpasses even the more celebrated Galapagos Islands. Among the native bird species here is the pink-footed shearwater, which breeds only on the Juan Fernandez islands and another Chilean island, but… Read More »A Chilean archipelago rivaling the Galapagos fends off invasive species

It’s a perfect year for a non-Thanksgiving

The youngest is Elsie Dubray, an entrant in the Intel World Science Fair contest with her research into the nutritional value (specifically the lipid structure) of buffalo meat, in contrast to beef. Dubray, now an undergraduate at Stanford, is a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation, and in Gather, she appears outdoors among the… Read More »It’s a perfect year for a non-Thanksgiving

Cooling La Nina may not save Great Barrier Reef from mass coral bleaching, experts warn

A global weather phenomenon that would typically keep ocean temperatures lower across the Great Barrier Reef may not be enough to stop another mass coral bleaching this coming summer, according to the marine park’s chief scientist. Global heating now meant the risk of corals bleaching from heat stress was present even in a summer influenced… Read More »Cooling La Nina may not save Great Barrier Reef from mass coral bleaching, experts warn

More than 3 billion people affected by water shortages, data shows

Water shortages are now affecting more than 3 billion people around the world, as the amount of fresh water available for each person has plunged by a fifth over two decades, data has shown. About 1.5 billion people are suffering severe water scarcity or even drought, as a combination of climate breakdown, rising demand and… Read More »More than 3 billion people affected by water shortages, data shows

EU urged to address aviation’s full climate impact, including non-CO2 emissions

The European Union has been urged to take action on the non-carbon emissions effect of air travel, in light of research published this week. The aviation sector’s climate impact is three times bigger than the effect of its carbon dioxide emissions alone, according to a study by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (Easa), the… Read More »EU urged to address aviation’s full climate impact, including non-CO2 emissions

Offsetting pivots from carbon to plastic

The average person is responsible for the disposal of an estimated 22 pounds of single-use plastic waste per month. A new programme launching tomorrow will offer consumers the option to “offset” that plastic waste by funding the clean up of 22 pounds of plastic from the environment. The programme, called Plastic Neutral, aims to establish… Read More »Offsetting pivots from carbon to plastic

Ohio State, landfill among largest greenhouse gas emitters in Franklin County

| The Columbus Dispatch Each year as temperatures warm and rainfall becomes more erratic, there’s a growing awareness of climate change. That means companies are taking a hard look at their emissions and sustainable practices as consumers are demanding corporations create and transport their products while having a smaller carbon footprint. Previous coverage: Huntington, L… Read More »Ohio State, landfill among largest greenhouse gas emitters in Franklin County

Economy on edge as militants blow up Shell/Agip gas pipelines

The International Police Organization (INTERPOL) has announced the arrest of 3 Nigerians for their alleged involvement in cyber-crime targeted at government agencies and private sector companies in over 150 countries since 2017. Their apprehension follows a joint INTERPOL, Group-IB and the Nigeria Police Force cybercrime investigation called Operation Falcon. This disclosure was contained in a… Read More »Economy on edge as militants blow up Shell/Agip gas pipelines

What is ghost fishing and why is it killing dolphins, whales and turtles?

Endangered turtles and dolphins species in the River Ganges are at risk from becoming entangled in abandoned fishing gear, new research has found. A survey of discarded fishing equipment, also known as ‘ghost gear’, was carried out along the entire length of the Ganges – from its source in the Himalayas to the river mouth… Read More »What is ghost fishing and why is it killing dolphins, whales and turtles?

U.S. Justice Department suing over Puyallup River pollution

SEATTLE (AP) — The U.S. Justice Department is suing the owners of the Electron dam for violating the Clean Water Act by polluting the Puyallup River. The civil suit was filed against Electron Hydro, LLC, Wednesday at the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. District Court for the Western District, The… Read More »U.S. Justice Department suing over Puyallup River pollution

Ontario hiking ethanol content in gasoline to help fight climate change

Integrated Grain Processors Co-operative Ethanol Inc. in Aylmer. (Free Press file photo) Share Adjust Comment Print Ontario plans to raise by half the ethanol content required in gasoline in a move to fight climate change that could also dangle benefits to Southwestern Ontario’s vast corn belt. The province says it will gradually increase the required… Read More »Ontario hiking ethanol content in gasoline to help fight climate change

The lasting influence of the Tofurky

(Photo credit: Andrea Nguyen / Flickr) Twenty-five years ago, a food called Tofurky made its debut on grocery store shelves. Since then, the tofu-based roast has become a beloved part of many vegetarians’ holiday feasts. “Tofurky and Thanksgiving are forever intimately tied in my heart,” says Jan Dutkiewicz, a visiting fellow at Harvard Law School’s… Read More »The lasting influence of the Tofurky

Premature deaths in Europe remain high despite better air quality

The number of premature deaths due to air pollution in Europe remains too high, at some 400,000 a year, despite improved air quality over the past decade. The latest report on air quality by the European Environment Agency (EEA) also shows that almost everyone in Europe is still affected by air pollution and that nearly… Read More »Premature deaths in Europe remain high despite better air quality

Two things to be thankful for…

What a dreadful year. But, still, we don’t have to venture far to find some silver linings in the toxic clouds. Environmental journalism rises from humanity’s latest ash piles. Our professional cousins, health journalism folks like Laurie Garrett and Maryn McKenna, saw their worst-case pandemic projections borne out, at horrible cost. Of course, vindicating some… Read More »Two things to be thankful for…

U.S. Army Corps denies permit for massive gold and copper mine in pristine Alaska

Bill Roth Anchorage Daily News/Tribune News Service/Getty Images Lake Iliamna, a nursery for wild salmon, would have faced damage from the construction of the Pebble Mine in Alaska. The Trump administration on Wednesday denied a key permit for a massive gold and copper mine in Alaska, striking a devastating blow to a project opposed by… Read More »U.S. Army Corps denies permit for massive gold and copper mine in pristine Alaska

New University of Utah study says air pollution hurts state’s homeless

Nearly nine out of 10 people experiencing homelessness have sought medical attention for a condition related to the state’s dirty air, according to a new University of Utah study that provides a first-of-its-kind look at the disproportionate impacts air pollution has on those living on Salt Lake City’s streets. Of the 138 people who were… Read More »New University of Utah study says air pollution hurts state’s homeless

Glyphosate exposure could disrupt human gut microbiome

Exposure to glyphosate, the main ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup, could adversely affect the microbes in our gut, which could lead to poor health. Glyphosate is a controversial broad action weedkiller that was introduced onto the market in 1974. Since then, its use has increased worldwide more than 100-fold. Aerial view of a tractor spraying… Read More »Glyphosate exposure could disrupt human gut microbiome

Contaminants in NJ soil and water are toxic, records reveal

Documents made public by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency show that PFAS compounds the chemical company Solvay has released in New Jersey are toxic to lab animals and people, stay in the human body for years, and were found in the blood of workers at two of… Read More »Contaminants in NJ soil and water are toxic, records reveal

Pennsylvania: Dimock residents worry about planned fracking waste well

A fracking wastewater treatment company is exploring the possibility of constructing an underground deep injection well in Dimock, Susquehanna County. If approved, it would be the first deep injection well built to handle fracking wastewater in eastern Pennsylvania. The Environmental Protection Agency has permitted at least 36 new underground wells to dispose of fracking waste… Read More »Pennsylvania: Dimock residents worry about planned fracking waste well

Italy’s doctors face new threat: Conspiracy theories

Press play to listen to this article Voiced by Amazon Polly MILAN — From “heroes” to “terrorists.” In Italy, the doctors and nurses lauded for their exhausting, dangerous work in the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic are facing a new challenge: conspiracy theories accusing them of faking the emergency. In one social media video,… Read More »Italy’s doctors face new threat: Conspiracy theories

As Biden targets climate change, we must focus attention on public health: Dr. Richard J. Jackson

Covid-19, the economy and climate change rank as the three greatest challenges facing the incoming Biden Administration. Human health and the need for substantive and influential health leadership weave through all three. But the looming public health crisis associated with climate change deserves particular attention. Biden’s policy developers are being informed by the “Climate 21… Read More »As Biden targets climate change, we must focus attention on public health: Dr. Richard J. Jackson

This Fixer wrote the book on addressing poverty, wastewater, and climate change in rural America

In portions of rural America, residents lack access to safe wastewater sanitation. Without proper infrastructure, people on septic systems, mobile-home owners, and even those attached to sewer systems may end up with raw sewage streaming into their yards or backing up into their homes. The exposure contributes to diseases, some of which we thought we’d… Read More »This Fixer wrote the book on addressing poverty, wastewater, and climate change in rural America

This sacred bean saved an Indigenous clan from climate calamity

Rita Uriana stooped to examine the stringy green plants covering the oasis in the Colombian desert. As the sun flared, she picked the pods and placed them in the fold of her yellow dress, knowing these beans are part of an agricultural revival that could feed hundreds of families in her desert-dwelling community. In the… Read More »This sacred bean saved an Indigenous clan from climate calamity

Trump races to weaken environmental and worker protections, implement other last-minute policies

ProPublica is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up to receive our biggest stories as soon as they’re published. Six days after President Donald Trump lost his bid for reelection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture notified food safety groups that it was proposing a regulatory change to speed up chicken factory processing… Read More »Trump races to weaken environmental and worker protections, implement other last-minute policies

EPA reaches settlement with Koppers Inc. over West Virginia and PA facilities

A Pittsburgh-based chemical and materials company has agreed to pay nearly $1 million for failing to follow state and federal laws for preventing and responding to oil spills, under a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The proposed agreement, announced last week, addresses more than 30 violations at Koppers Inc. facilities in Follansbee and… Read More »EPA reaches settlement with Koppers Inc. over West Virginia and PA facilities

Can Biden’s climate plan spark cooperation in Pa.? Some see possible common ground in jobs, infrastructure | StateImpact Pennsylvania

Climate change is one of the four major crises President-elect Joe Biden hopes to tackle after he’s sworn into office in January. His goal is for the U.S. to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. In Pennsylvania, a high-polluting state with a history of coal and natural gas production, it’s fair to expect pushback… Read More »Can Biden’s climate plan spark cooperation in Pa.? Some see possible common ground in jobs, infrastructure | StateImpact Pennsylvania

Record-shattering warmth pushes Arctic temperatures to 12 degrees F above normal

Even as winter darkness descends across the Arctic, a year of record-breaking heat continues. Temperatures last weekend across the entire Arctic basin hit 12 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, scientists announced, with some areas measuring as high as 30 degrees F or more above the norm. These extraordinary temperatures come on the heels of an exceptionally… Read More »Record-shattering warmth pushes Arctic temperatures to 12 degrees F above normal

A power company’s quiet land-buying spree could shield it from coal ash cleanup costs

ProPublica is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up to receive our biggest stories as soon as they’re published. Over the past several years, utility giant Georgia Power has embarked on an unusual buying spree, paying top dollar for people’s property in places where cheap land was easy to find. In 2016,… Read More »A power company’s quiet land-buying spree could shield it from coal ash cleanup costs

6,000 years of arrows emerge from melting Norwegian ice patch

Archaeologists in Norway have discovered dozens of arrows—some dating back 6,000 years—melting out of a 60-acre ice patch in the county’s high mountains. Expeditions to survey the Langfonne ice patch in 2014 and 2016, both particularly warm summers, also revealed copious reindeer bones and antlers, suggesting that hunters used the ice patch over the course… Read More »6,000 years of arrows emerge from melting Norwegian ice patch

As water backs up, an asset in Michigan becomes a liability

A drainage dispute roils Jackson County’s prized attraction and its operation. Photo provided by Elaine Wolf-Baker By Hannah Ni’Shuilleabhain, Circle of Blue Elaine Wolf-Baker remembers a childhood spent ice skating on the frozen pond in Sparks Foundation County Park, a landmark in Jackson County. She grew up here, amid the lake-dappled landscape of southern Michigan,… Read More »As water backs up, an asset in Michigan becomes a liability

Outdoor heaters seem like a huge waste. Are they really?

It’s getting chilly out there. And whether you’re hosting an alfresco Thanksgiving celebration or just trying not to freeze while working from home, you may be curious about the best way to heat yourself, but not the planet, this winter. Let’s look at outdoor options first. Many people have purchased fire pits and patio heaters… Read More »Outdoor heaters seem like a huge waste. Are they really?

Western Europe cools on plans for nuclear power

As more reactors face closure, governments in Europe may prefer renewable energy to replace nuclear power. LONDON, 25 November, 2020 – News that two more reactors in the United Kingdom are to shut down on safety grounds earlier than planned has capped a depressing month for nuclear power in Europe. The news came after weeks… Read More »Western Europe cools on plans for nuclear power

LKAB invests up to EUR39bn in massive transformation for carbon-free future

The unprecedented plans, presented on Monday, should pave the way for global mining industry to help cut its carbon-footprints. “This is the biggest transformation in the company’s 130-year history and could end up being the largest industrial investment ever made in Sweden. It creates unique opportunities to reduce the world’s carbon emissions and for Swedish… Read More »LKAB invests up to EUR39bn in massive transformation for carbon-free future

Nunavut ‘repeatedly refused’ to disclose impacts of mine expansion on caribou: mayor

If there’s scientific evidence backing up claims that barren-ground caribou won’t be impacted by a proposed mine expansion on Baffin Island, the mayor of Clyde River, Nunavut, has yet to see it. Jerry Natanine told The Narwhal an absence of available data is stoking concern that increasing the size of one of the world’s northernmost… Read More »Nunavut ‘repeatedly refused’ to disclose impacts of mine expansion on caribou: mayor

When rubber hits the road–and washes away

Vehicle emissions are clearly a pollution problem, but new research puts the spotlight on the environmental effects of tire particles. Photo by Pgiam/iStock A stealthy source of pollution leaves the highway in astonishing amounts and heads to sea, toxic chemicals and all. Authored by by Wordcount November 24, 2020 | 2,000 words, about 10 minutes… Read More »When rubber hits the road–and washes away

Amazon initiative pays farmers and ranchers to keep the forest standing

The Conserv initiative, created by nonprofit organizations in Brazil and the U.S., is paying farmers and ranchers in the Amazon to preserve more native vegetation on their land than required by law. There are still more than 20 million hectares (49 million acres) of forest inside the Brazilian Amazon that can legally be cut. The… Read More »Amazon initiative pays farmers and ranchers to keep the forest standing

Are industrial chemicals killing rare whales and familiar dolphins?

Dozens of whales and dolphins that beached themselves on the U.S. Atlantic Coast contained high levels of pollutants and heavy metals in their blubber and liver tissues, a new study shows. For the first time, scientists detected the widely used antibiotic Triclosan and the popular herbicide Atrazine in rare species that spend their lives hundreds… Read More »Are industrial chemicals killing rare whales and familiar dolphins?

The dark side of Italian hazelnut farming

As the early morning mist clears to reveal the turrets of San Quirico Castle in central Italy, the greenery surrounding local farmhouses comes alive with sound: Red-bellied woodpeckers chirp and bright-green tree frogs call to each other among the cypress and beech trees. But walk a little further towards the fields of young hazelnut plantations… Read More »The dark side of Italian hazelnut farming

Can plastic bottle caps help cleanse the Indian River Lagoon?

Abbey Gering, a graduate student at Florida Institute of Technology, samples water from a tank filled with bottle caps. Researchers at FIT plan to put the plastic caps in contained mesh sack treatment systems to help foster conditions to maximize bacteria’s ability to remove excess nitrogen from the Indian River Lagoon. (Photo: Austin Fox) This… Read More »Can plastic bottle caps help cleanse the Indian River Lagoon?

EPA proposes rule limiting Indiana, other states’ contribution to downwind ozone pollution

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is revising a rule that limits ozone air pollution from upwind states, including Indiana, that contribute to air pollution problems in downwind states on the east coast. The proposed Revised Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Update would further limit ozone and ozone precursor emissions from power plants in Indiana and 11… Read More »EPA proposes rule limiting Indiana, other states’ contribution to downwind ozone pollution

New Zealand geologists plan to harness volcano heat to reduce climate emissions

A group of geologists in Dunedin are hoping to reduce climate-damaging emissions by drilling deep into an extinct 11-million-year-old volcano below the South Island city to harness its heat. Dr Mike Palin and Otago University colleagues are exploring whether the heat could be a viable energy resource, “thereby reducing carbon-based fuel consumption and consequent greenhouse… Read More »New Zealand geologists plan to harness volcano heat to reduce climate emissions

Researcher raises Muskrat methylmercury alarm, but Nalcor contractor says levels safe

There’s mixed messaging emerging from the debate over methylmercury contamination in Labrador, with a U.S. researcher again raising the alarm about the toxic organic compound, while a contractor monitoring the effects of Muskrat Falls — backed up by the Department of Environment — says there’s no need to worry. Ryan Calder co-authored a 2015 study… Read More »Researcher raises Muskrat methylmercury alarm, but Nalcor contractor says levels safe

Fears for environment after 50,000 fish escape salmon farm in Tasmania Megan McLaughlin

An outbreak of 50,000 Tasmanian farmed salmon could potentially “pollute” the marine environment, according to local environmentalists. The fish rushed to freedom after a fire melted part of their enclosure on Monday morning, and while the company involved said it did not expect the fugitive fish to damage the environment, others disagree. “Escaped salmon typically… Read More »Fears for environment after 50,000 fish escape salmon farm in Tasmania Megan McLaughlin

Many roads aren’t ready for climate change Megan McLaughlin

(Photo credit: Schlaglocher in Essen / CC BY 2.0) Most road surfaces in the U.S. look pretty similar, so you might think they’re all the same. But they’re not. Transportation engineers design asphalt roads specifically for the local climate, considering temperature, precipitation, and humidity. “The material that we use in Arizona will be different than… Read More »Many roads aren’t ready for climate change Megan McLaughlin

Fossil fuels will decline but unless Canada takes action will remain a big player in Canada’s energy use by 2050: Report Megan McLaughlin

Pumpjacks draw oil out of the ground as a deer stands in a canola field near Olds, Alta., on Thursday, July 16, 2020. File photo by The Canadian Press/Jeff McIntosh The Canada Energy Regulator says reaching net-zero emissions over the next 30 years will require a much more aggressive transition away from oil and gas.… Read More »Fossil fuels will decline but unless Canada takes action will remain a big player in Canada’s energy use by 2050: Report Megan McLaughlin

As bee population numbers plummet with climate change, ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ emerge Megan McLaughlin

Today, multinational pharmaceutical company Pfizer reported their mRNA-based vaccine candidate, BNT162b2, was more than 90 percent effective against SARS-CoV-2, based on early phase 3 clinical trial data. The study enrolled 43,538 participants in six countries who were spilt into two groups: a group that was received the vaccine candidate, and a group that received a… Read More »As bee population numbers plummet with climate change, ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ emerge Megan McLaughlin